Adventures and Cruises

At the heart of our magazine are the stories related by our readers of their adventures and cruises. There are so many and so many different kinds. Below are some of our favorites.


Maine chartering: Nobody got hurt

Maine chartering: Nobody got hurt

July 2021 By Thomas Dudley This posthumously published essay is the second in a series of lively, often wry, reminiscences to be published in Points East over the coming months. Thomas Minot Dudley, of Durham, N.H., died at the age of 83 the day after
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Tired of the same old spots? Move it!

Tired of the same old spots? Move it!

These two Massachusetts-based families decided to reposition their boats for a season to explore regions outside their usual homeport cruising range.
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Messing about with . . . goats!

Messing about with . . . goats!

There is nothing worth doing more than “messing about in boats,” extolled Mr. Water Rat in “The Wind in the Willows.” But you don’t want to mess with mischievous farm stock on a Connecticut island.
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Anhinga, and the lessons learned

Photo courtesy Roger Long June 2021 By Roger Long Senior year in high school was when I put away childish things and became fully obsessed with boats. I’d made a weeklong cruise in my 10’ dinghy with a boom tent the summer before on Lake
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Self-quarantine cruise

Self-quarantine cruise

Restrictions of a worldwide virus made working online from home the norm, so, with our Nordic 44 Mystic waiting in Maine, why not call her home-in-transit for a few weeks and set sail?
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From Maine to Spain on Galatea

From Maine to Spain on Galatea

“How to move. When to move. If you had to think about it, you weren’t going on the boat.” The boat was Galatea – a 38-foot steel-hulled yawl that was sailed across the Atlantic in the summer of 1964 – and the remembrance is courtesy
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Dudley and sailing evermore

Dudley and sailing evermore

From an early age, the author was drawn to the mystical act of propelling a sailing vessel by harnessing the wind; and his wife, Dudley, also felt the magic. But it wasn’t all “tailwinds and flat seas.”
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The river turns the wheel

The river turns the wheel

And, in Newburyport, Mass., it always has, literally and figuratively, as the mighty Merrimack River has powered a shipbuilding industry, a rich international trade, mill wheels, and, today, a waterborne tourism.
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Saoirse was 40 feet of rusting vessel destined for the scrap heap. Now she’s home sweet home

Saoirse was 40 feet of rusting vessel destined for the scrap heap. Now she’s home sweet home

One person’s candidate for the junk pile can be another’s gem. And thus it was that a beloved, but deteriorating, steel sailboat became a treasure for a couple in search of a new floating abode.
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Anniversary Blowout

Anniversary Blowout

During the summer of COVID-19, we celebrated 33 years of marriage by cruising locally, focusing on Buzzards Bay and cozy Rhode Island. Short of a hurricane, what could possibly rain on our parade?
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Capable hands

Capable hands

March/April 2021 By Paul Brown In the late 1980s I was relatively new to sailing, and had recently purchased a 1968 Thunderbird 26 I named Brownscow. Brownscow’s design was the result of a contest offered by a West Coast plywood company in 1958, and –
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Boothbay, by gosh!

Boothbay, by gosh!

Part 3: The J/30 Mojo finally found some wind, and Mark and Diana sailed efficiently from Portsmouth, N.H., to Boothbay Harbor, Maine, despite a nav-bungle and a minor piloting error.
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Round-trip ticket: Bahamas

Round-trip ticket: Bahamas

The author and his wife had long dreamed of cruising south for the winter and returning in the spring. Finally they did it, with two dogs, aboard the Banjer 37 motorsailer Magus.
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All’s well that ends well

All’s well that ends well

While I have made many hundreds of trips from Portsmouth Harbor to the Isles of Shoals across the full range of weather and seasons (wind, rain, fog, snow and freezing spray) I had never been thoroughly scared until one afternoon a few weeks ago.
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Baptism by fire, Part II

Baptism by fire, Part II

Part 2: Some hairy autumn sea miles remained between Sea-Finn and her Midcoast Maine destination, including a forecast of 17- to 20-foot waves, 65-mph winds – and infamous Kennedy Rock.
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“Plenty in ’20” and Plan D

“Plenty in ’20” and Plan D

By Pam Humbert For Points East The new year was still young and unsullied back in mid-January when our club met to unveil their summer cruising plans. The room was abuzz with dreams and the anticipation of a fresh new year and a season yet
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Fishers Finally!

Fishers Finally!

The fates conspired against me in my attempts to visit Fishers Island, as though an invisible force was blocking my access to it. Last summer, I broke through, with an emotional epiphany.
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Revisiting Roque and Mistake Islands

Revisiting Roque and Mistake Islands

By Tim Plouff For Points East It was to be a glorious summer day in Maine, and the promise of making new discoveries – as always, to us – was as exciting as the forecast. Our boating friends Allison and Andy Moorwood had proposed a
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The Gulf, golf and the kid

The Gulf, golf and the kid

How do you get a teen-age boy to go cruising in Maine with his father (no, this is not the lead to a new joke), to share in the joy of quiet nights under a blanket of stars, to be away from his friends, from
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A solo transverse of the Cape Cod Canal

By Chuck Roast I had just blown in from Gloucester, Mass., the day before on Navicula, my Cape Dory 33, courtesy of a stiff breeze from the northeast. The morning would begin in Provincetown, Mass., with what may well have been the worst breakfast of
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Muscobe to Menemsha

Muscobe to Menemsha

When my son and shipmate Randy, and his family, rented a cottage in Chilmark, on Martha’s Vineyard, I decided to solo my 33-foot Young Brothers Jonesport-type lobsterboat south for a visit.
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But we must be in North Carolina!

But we must be in North Carolina!

By Nim Marsh For Points East Magazine November 12 breaks in high overcast, 52°, wind southwest, 10. At mid-day the air is still raw, but the compass reads 180° – due south – and all is right with the world. At roughly Mile 34 on
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Mojo: Maine or bust

Mojo: Maine or bust

Part 2: Contending with windless seas, tipsy restaurant diners, and the threat of leisurely breakfasts and shopping sprees, the J/30 Mojo finds herself near the doorstep of the Maine coast.
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Baptism by fire

Baptism by fire

Part 1: With crew unavailable, the author, a relative cruising greenhorn, chose to singlehand to Downeast Maine from New York. He reached Kennebunkport, learned a lot, and nobody got hurt.
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Mojo bound for Maine

Mojo bound for Maine

Mark and the indomitable Diana set sail from Buzzards Bay’s Red Brook Harbor aboard the J/30 Mojo, destination Mount Desert in Downeast Maine. The first leg, to Gloucester, was almost flawless.
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In search of the Red Paint People

In search of the Red Paint People

By David Roper This year’s cruise to Maine was supposed to be a quiet, reflective time spent mostly anchored alone in a bay I’ve always loved. For the first time in many years, my wife would sail with me on the Downeast leg from our
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Someone to watch over me

Someone to watch over me

A medical emergency cuts short a cruise of a lifetime
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Threading the needle

Threading the needle

Some of the coast’s most interesting eel ruts are invested of a particular attraction because only rarely do the tides, our timing, and the weather align, at which occasion we get to plumb the depths of interesting places like Pleasant Point Gut. Only a few
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Harwich Port, Mass.: Home away from home

Harwich Port, Mass.: Home away from home

Home: safety, quietude, belonging. Port: haven for mariners and vessels. Saquatucket Harbor, in Harwich Port, Mass., has been our home port – away from our true home port – for 20 years.
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A new boat for Diana

A new boat for Diana

I promised I’d buy a bigger boat, with a standing-headroom cabin, if she survived a summer cruising on my J/24. She not only endured, she thrived. The ball was in my court. Big time!
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Blowing in the wind

To those of us who set sail for Downeast and the Maritimes, the summer winds are our best friends and most demanding of adversaries. They fulfill our ambitions, deny our intentions, try our patience, keep us awake, lull us to sleep, and cool, chill and
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Force 8 Cape Cod

Force 8 Cape Cod

June, 1994. 200 miles south of The Cape. Wind 40 knots, gusting higher. 20-foot waves. Water north of the Gulf Stream 50 degrees. Destination, Spain. This is the story of how we almost got there.
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The mouse that roars

The mouse that roars

Let’s join this peripatetic cruiser aboard his Saga 43 ILENE, around the cabin table, for a breezy account of a monthlong cruise along tiny Rhode Island’s extensive and varied shores.
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Into the quiet

Into the quiet

Cruising under sail is one of the few places in life in which we can escape a world certain it has a right to be in our faces 24/7, to always be badgering us to buy stuff, act now, shape and share our views, to
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Taking cover

It was a pleasant enough day when a friend and I took a new-to-me 14’ runabout down the Providence River from the neighborhood of Riverside in East Providence. At 16 years old we were venturing into the “vast open water” of Narragansett Bay south of
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Grateful summer: Cruising with cancer

Grateful summer: Cruising with cancer

We always spend as much time as possible on our Finngulf 391 sloop West Wind, a 39’ masterpiece from Finland. Whether we would be aboard this past summer was certainly in doubt.
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Waterlilies 2.0

Waterlilies 2.0

By Marilyn Pond Brigham From 2005 to 2009, I was a Waterlily. Waterlilies are members of the mostly over-40 ladies sailing program at Quissett Yacht Club (QYC) in Falmouth, Mass. The Waterlilies program meets on Friday mornings, July through August, and has done so since
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Innocents abroad

Innocents abroad

By Frederick Findlen One beautiful October morning, my wife and I, both novice mariners, decided to take our last boating trip of the year. We checked the marine forecast, then launched our 17-foot motorboat in the New Meadows River in Brunswick, Maine. The plan was
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Downeast Express

Downeast Express

Ride the prevailing southwest wind north and east along the New England coast, and you’ll ultimately find yourself in the pristine waters of Downeast Maine. Take the offshore fast track there.
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My own sailing legacy

My own sailing legacy

I married this man because, well, sailing was part of his fabric, and I was determined it would be part of mine, too. Little did I know then that I also had a magic boating key to pass on to my family.
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Running home from COVID-19

Running home from COVID-19

By Dick Klain My last cruise down the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) was several years ago. Since that time, I have stayed up to date on the ditch through friends. When the coronavirus hit, I wondered what my friends who were still down south would be
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Rockin’ around the clock

Rockin’ around the clock

This means we’re going to cruise clockwise around a figurative clock face in Gloucester Harbor, check out the seaport’s charms, and learn of the weed-bearded growlers and hazards that abound there.
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The reluctant sailor’s ICW guide

The reluctant sailor’s ICW guide

Sailing Scared: Maine to Florida 2014-15 by Karlene Osborne; Custom Communications, Inc., 2019; 128 pp.; $16.95. Book review by Randy Randall Reading “Sailing Scared,” Karlene Osborne’s new book about a cruise from Maine to Florida via the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW), one realizes early on how
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Mad dash to go-back

Mad dash to go-back

Experience is the best teacher, and lessons can be learned by straddling “exciting” and “really dumb.” In that spirit, I planned a 20-mile, Force 5 downwind flier from Portland to Harpswell
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‘OK, Irv, you’re right!’

‘OK, Irv, you’re right!’

Guest Perspective: Paul Brown Fundy Flotilla 2004, from Northeast Harbor to Grand Manan, and then on to Saint John and the St. John River. Brownscow, my Beneteau Evasion 32, had made it to Grand Manan, New Brunswick, and then had to leave the flotilla as
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Deliverance

Deliverance

The schooner was pinned against 40-foot cliffs, pounded by seas that threw spray over their tops. A former owner of a towing and salvage firm, I thought I could haul her off with my 46-foot sedan cruiser.
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Cruising with Diana, Part II

Cruising with Diana, Part II

On their first short cruises as a couple (see “Cruising with Diana, Part 1,” December 2019), it was two boat-lengths forward/one back for Mark and Diana as they set courses – often divergent – to perceived common grounds on which they might sail constructively, as
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Lit picks, and venturing out

Lit picks, and venturing out

The first trip to the Isles of Shoals in the new year was a combination supply run for the Star Island caretakers and a reconnaissance mission for upcoming building projects. We loaded a dozen small bags of groceries and a few bottles of wine –
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Cruising with Diana

Cruising with Diana

Part 1: I had this great, new girlfriend, and I wanted to take her cruising, but my boat was a 40-year-old J/24 with minimal, claustrophobic accommodations. Well, one step at a time.
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‘Low bridge, everybody down…’

‘Low bridge, everybody down…’

 “Low bridge, we’re coming to a town,” the old barge song continues, and these days many of those towns on New York’s Western Erie Canal and Seneca Lake are spellbinding waterfront villages. Aboard Weak Moment, our 32-foot trawler, we’ve now seen quite a few of
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Saddleback Island

Saddleback Island

By Tim Plouff For most Mainers, the name Saddleback has long been associated with the western Maine mountain near Rangeley that was a popular ski resort for decades before successive owners fell on hard times. While the ski trails remain closed, an effort to re-start
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Boating and a big slice of humble pie

Boating and a big slice of humble pie

Many years ago, in the late ’90s, I had an old Star that I loved in a way that was inversely proportional to the aggravation it caused me. One of my top-five epic sails was aboard this boat, as was one of my top-five epic
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Good counsel, and sailing faster than the wind

In spite of my best-laid plans, a second season has now passed without launching our sloop Aloft. We have used the time to make numerous upgrades, and she now has a totally new rig, engine, and plank fastenings below the waterline. With her updated electronics
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An ode to slow

An ode to slow

We awoke to the reflections of sunlit seas dancing across the cabin ceiling, a rich wash of blue sky overhead and the telltales hanging limp. The mate, who functions better than I in the early hours, pulled up a forecast. “Southwest 5,” she muttered sleepily
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Hurricane Dorian and the “dream wedding”

Hurricane Dorian and the “dream wedding”

The last big weekend of the year promised a full house at the Oceanic Hotel. A two-day island wedding extravaganza was also on the schedule.
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A late-season delivery

A late-season delivery

Guest Perspective: Capt. Michael L. Martel I awoke in the darkness with a start, disoriented, only to eventually realize that I was still in my bunk, fully dressed and wrapped in my blanket against the cold. Even though the last two days had seen the
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A blazing beginning

A blazing beginning

 The move aboard Klang II was supposed to be the start of our live-aboard lives and, perhaps, some ocean vagabond years, but a boatyard conflagration made a grand attempt to intervene.
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Cruising aboard the Caravan 18

Cruising aboard the Caravan 18

Guest perspective: Christopher Birch “What’d you sail in on?” asked the man shaving at the sink next to me. “A Caravan 18,” I replied, pleased with my quick thinking and grateful for the shaving cream concealing my smirk. It was a beautiful August morning in
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A quart in a pint pot

A quart in a pint pot

Sure, New Hampshire has a paltry 18 miles of Atlantic shoreline, but it packs a disproportionately wide variety of cruising sights and experiences in just New Castle and Portsmouth alone.
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La Dolce Vita

La Dolce Vita

And it was a sweet life indeed aboard the 41-foot Concordia yawl Dolce, on a delivery from Boston to the Newport Boat Brokerage Show to be sold. No one bought her, but that isn’t my story.
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Now this is downeast cruising

Now this is downeast cruising

Part 2: For years, son Randy wanted to spend just one night where no marinas, restaurants, or marine facilities existed, just wildness. Before we turned back to Marblehead, I took him to Roque Island.
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Charming the snake

Charming the snake

The Cape Cod Canal separates the Cape peninsula from the mainland in serpentine fashion, and, as with the notorious reptile of Eden, transit requires numerous encounters with tidal temptation.
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‘Now this is Downeast cruising’

‘Now this is Downeast cruising’

Part 1: Glorious sunshine, water glinting like diamonds, spruces above granite-shored islands, a lobsterman’s windshield flashing in the sun. This is what we dream about on dreary February days.
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Helping to keep the waters clean

Helping to keep the waters clean

Guest perspective/Randy Randall “Hey Dad,” Jeremy yelled. “Looks like you hit the jackpot! What is all this stuff?” He was right. I’d practically filled the front of my kayak with trash. “Help me unload all this,” I told him. But you see collecting trash is
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Martha’s Vineyard ports-of-call

Martha’s Vineyard ports-of-call

I’ve explored five Martha’s Vineyard harbors – Menemsha, Lake Tashmoo, Vineyard Haven, Oak Bluffs and Edgartown – and each seems to delight visiting cruisers in its own special way
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Tankers are fast

Guest perspective/Randy Randall Oil tankers are fast. Much faster than you probably think. The behemoth ships that seem to take forever to cross the horizon when you’re offshore are actually moving right along. They’re like an optical illusion – so big and imposing, so long
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First to Block (Island, that is)

First to Block (Island, that is)

Anyone who’s been to Great Salt Pond, on Block Island, knows how magical it is, especially on a warm summer night, and you’re surrounded by hundreds of other cruisers. Without anyone there – not a single other boat – would it still feel the same
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Maine cruise: Unplugged

Maine cruise: Unplugged

Part 2: The author reveals more favorite Maine anchorages – not the “best” ones – and the crew of the Saga 43 Ilene favors small places with solitude or ones with good eats, museums and theater.
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Holy Cannoli! I like to sail

Holy Cannoli! I like to sail

Smitten by the Masefield “Sea Fever” romance of sailing vessels, but hesitant to embrace the recreation of moving small boats with the wind, Tricia espouses powerboating. Years later, epiphany.
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Fast forward to Boothbay

Fast forward to Boothbay

You’re watching a video of the coast from Mystic, Conn., to Boothbay, Maine, filmed in midsummer from offshore. Now press the fast-forward. But don’t forget fast-reverse.
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Our Favorite Maine anchorages

Our Favorite Maine anchorages

Part 1: Not “Best Anchorages,” just our preferred harbors, islands, rivers and coves, and we favor smaller places with nature and solitude – or ones with good eats, museums and theater.
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Bound for Salem

Bound for Salem

And why not? This seaport on the North Shore of Boston has a grand maritime history, classic architecture, tourist haunts, boating services, and more witchcraft lore than the average salt can handle.
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Busman’s holiday

Busman’s holiday

Part 2: Former professional mariner Capt. Dick Allen and his wife Bev begin the circuitous homeward leg of their inland Triangle Loop cruise aboard their 32-foot Seaquest trawler Weak Moment.
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Busman’s Holiday

Busman’s Holiday

Part 1: What does a former professional ocean mariner do when he seeks relaxation? He heads to the inland waterways of the U.S. and Canadian Triangle Loop on his 32-foot trawler.
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Racing Eros

Racing Eros

Competing in a New England classic-yacht event aboard a British-built 1939 Gloucester-type staysail schooner may not be for the weak of spirit, but it will be exhilarating and the experience of a lifetime.
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Waterworld

Waterworld

New England offers countless harbors, both great and small – some bustling with commercial traffic, others quiet and “undiscovered.” For me, none is more interesting, vibrant or gorgeous than Boston Harbor.
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Long Island inside

Long Island inside

Part 2: In the August issue, the McGuires and their trawler Hope entered Long Island Sound, expecting to be underwhelmed. Instead they were delighted and excited. On the next leg, they were challenged.
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Nova Scotia idyll

Nova Scotia idyll

In 2017, we cruised from our hailing port of New York City to the Bras d’Or Lakes of Cape Breton Island, at the north end of the Maritime province of Nova Scotia. We liked what we found.
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A Newfoundland summer

A Newfoundland summer

“You have to sail Newfoundland; there’s nothing like it,” a colleague had proffered decades ago. And for years we dreamed of cruising to this Maritime province. Then, finally, our reverie came true.
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Surprise, surprise

Surprise, surprise

Our eastern Long Island Sound cruise was one of the more delightful – and humorous – we’ve ever logged; and it was, literally, right around the corner from our Rhode Island homeport.
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Offshore: Bigger and More

Offshore: Bigger and More

In 2017, ten sports boarded the f/v Nor’easter, out of Kennebunkport, Maine, to fish some 25 miles at sea, in 300 feet of water on Jeffreys Ledge, for cod, haddock, pollock . . . and blue shark!?
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Bound for Northeast Harbor?

Part 2: Grateful to be under way again, we envisioned plying Somes Sound and visiting the Japanese gardens at Northeast Harbor’s Asticou Inn. But, as we left Stonington, engine alarms shattered the peace and our plans.
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Life as a human spar

Life as a human spar

Can a sail across Maine’s Casco Bay qualify as a cruise? Yes, when the vessel is a nine-foot Nutshell Pram with a podiatric whisker pole and the skipper has prehensile toes.
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And finally to Roque

And finally to Roque

Part 2: In the December issue, this 75-year-old circumnavigator was motoring toward the legendary Downeast island from southern Maine in an 80-year-old square-stern canoe when his cruise went figuratively south. Here’s how he reached his hallowed destination.
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‘Another crazy scheme’

‘Another crazy scheme’

Part 1: A 75-year-old circumnavigator, I hoped to visit Roque Island, Downeast, from southern Maine, in an 80-year-old canvas-covered, square-stern canoe. My learning curve was steep.
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Bound south on the ICW? Read this first!

Bound south on the ICW? Read this first!

We’ve got routes and geographical waypoints. Alternate itineraries. Mileages. Shoal sections. Open stretches. Wind exposures. History of the Atlantic, Gulf and Okeechobee waterways.
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Smitten with Lady Liberty

Smitten with Lady Liberty

Part 1: We were told that the Statue of Liberty must be seen at least once from one’s own boat. This was our hook for a cruise from Newburyport, Mass., to New York Harbor.
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No oysters today

No oysters today

Guest perspective/W.R. Cheney Someone once said, “Go west young man,” and I usually do, although I’m not that young any more. I go west not to build a sod house and start a farm on the Great Plains, nor to join the forty-niners seeking gold
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Four years on the Waterway

Four years on the Waterway

Guest perspective/Bill Hezlep In the Rivers and Harbors Act of March 3, 1909 , Congress ordered the United States Army Corps of Engineers to develop a set of surveys and proposals for the construction of “a continuous waterway, inland where practicable,Read More
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Go someplace new

Go someplace new

Guest Perspective/Russ Roth Every year Marty and I try to go someplace new. For us this is primarily focused on the coast of Maine. But we believe it is something to strive for no matter your homeport. It is just too easy to fall into
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20 years of running the river

20 years of running the river

The Run to the Crescent is a fundraising 13-mile inflatable-dinghy cruise-in-company from Newburyport, Mass., up the Merrimack River to the Crescent Yacht Club in Haverhill.
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Season’s last ride

Season’s last ride

Fall. This four-letter word creates passion in many, but I lament the nasty season that follows, so please excuse my disdain for the arrival of autumn.
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Germination of a dream

Germination of a dream

Like so many New England sailors, I have long thought of taking Preamble, my 1998 Island Packet 37, south for the winter. Typically, the idea surfaces while I’m finalizing my fall haul-out and winter storage plans.
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Cruise to Cuba

Cruise to Cuba

More than 60 years ago, a young Bay Stater conceived the idea, and started planning it only a couple of years ago. Now it’s been realized in a fast Cal 2-30 named Scooch.
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The meaning of ‘Fathom’

The meaning of ‘Fathom’

What an incredible week my husband Bob and I had aboard the 700-passenger m/v Adonia, the sole ship in Carnival Corp’s brand-new Fathom line.
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A winter delivery becomes a solistice sleighride

A winter delivery becomes a solistice sleighride

Our mission was to deliver a 38-foot Young Brothers gillnetter from Islip, Long Island, to Portland, Maine, the week before Christmas. The pennants on her gillnet buoys snapped ominously like prayer flags.
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Cruising the Kite Loop

Cruising the Kite Loop

Part 1: What do you do when you want to attempt the Great Loop, or the Down East Loop, but don’t have the time? You invent a new, shorter circle and name it after its fanciful shape.
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Cruising in Buckman’s Wake

Cruising in Buckman’s Wake

In the spirit of minimalist David Buckman, the author embarked upon his “Epic Voyage Writ Small” in a 20-foot daysailer. But did David ever sail with two 10-year-olds as crew?
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Quarry cruise

Quarry cruise

Part I: The 19th- and early 20th-century granite mining operations in Maine's Penobscot Bay were the hooks for this trailer-boat cruise to Hurricane Island, Tenants Harbor, and the Muscle Ridge Channel.
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Boats, bikes and beaches

Boats, bikes and beaches

A perfect summer day on the outer Cranberry Isles - with boat and bicycles - confirmed to us that this combination is ideal for scratching the surface of these islands.
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Along the Reach

Along the Reach

A leisurely ramble, east to west along Maine's Eggemoggin Reach in wet, windless and buggy conditions still delights the skipper of the 22-foot, engineless catboat Penelope.
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You’ll never believe what we saw on the ICW

You’ll never believe what we saw on the ICW

While Middle America puts on a pretty face for those who pass by on the highway, the view from the Intracoastal Waterway is of a different stripe, perhaps a more accurate display of what America is all about.
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A pocket cruise in the Elizabeths

A pocket cruise in the Elizabeths

Between Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound are the pristine Elizabeth Islands, from which it's a short hop to Martha's Vineyard. A pleasant, relaxing week of true cruising can be had in and around them.
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Back on the land

Back on the land

After five years of roaming the seas, the Martin family has found a spot of land on which to live, at least for now.
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